Ophelia Passing (Ophelia 2)

(Ophelia, John Everett Millais 1852)

(Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1)

HAMLET

Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
force of honesty can translate beauty into his
likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
time gives it proof. I did love you once.

OPHELIA

Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

HAMLET

You should not have believed me; for virtue cannot
so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of
it: I loved you not.

OPHELIA

I was the more deceived.

HAMLET

Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a
breeder of sinners? I am myself indifferent honest;
but yet I could accuse me of such things that it
were better my mother had not borne me: I am very
proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at
my beck than I have thoughts to put them in,
imagination to give them shape, or time to act them
in. What should such fellows as I do crawling
between earth and heaven? We are arrant knaves,
all; believe none of us. Go thy ways to a nunnery.

So here are the rest of the photos from the Ophelia photoshoot. Much happenings have passed since my Ophelia post. I’m still (happily) slaving away at the boutique, and I’m two weeks older. I think I really should go and re-read the original script of Hamlet, because many of the interpretations sadden me a little. We’ve finally finished watching Laurence Oliver’s 1948 film version of Hamlet this week, which I must say wasn’t an entirely satisfying experience. I was unsure about several cuts that he made from the original play, but that I can’t comment on intelligently until I’ve studied the play again. Though course I’m bearing a personal grudge towards Olivier for not letting Vivien Leigh play Ophelia on grounds of her age, which seems to me strange if he didn’t have concerns of the same degree for his own age. There was for me a bit of unintended comic moments, perhaps resulting from the film’s Film Noir tendencies. And poor Jean Simmons(otherwise a very, very pretty girl) was sometimes disturbing to behold (methinks not in the intended way).

But there, I’m launching into a (slightly bitter) review. That I should not do, until I’ve educated myself well enough to know what I speak. For now it should suffice to say that I’ll probably have more good times reading about Ophelia. And I may do a review of the film in time. I also hope to find more relevant images for my Ophelia Pinterest picture board.

The above excerpt from Hamlet Act 3 contains one of the quotes that often surface to my mind: “Get thee to a nunnery”. I wonder whether by her drowning, Ophelia has gotten herself into a nunnery.

And I personally entertain the thought and vision of Ophelia, safe and dry, watching herself passing in the water as if it’s another self or life. If the maiden’s life was as elusive as her death was, and if she had never really lived while she was alive, then it may as well be that she never died.

(Hamlet Act 4, Scene 5)

OPHELIA
They bore him barefaced on the bier;
Hey non nonny, nonny, hey nonny;
And in his grave rain’d many a tear:–
Fare you well, my dove!

(Photos by JEG)

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Ophelia Passing (Ophelia 2)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s